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Saturday, December 10, 2016

My personal opinion on wild animals as "exotic pets" & the exotic pet trade, plus info on red foxes, wolves & wolfdogs as pets

Even though I am pro animal rights, I am not have much of a problem with people keeping exotic animals (definitely no problem whatsoever in cases where they have little to no chance to survive on their own in the wild). 
BUT, I want these animals to be treated and handled humanely (treat him/her better than how you would want yourself to be treated if you're in their skin), safely (make sure that they are not harmed and that they're kept in a way that wouldn't pose a significant safety or environmental threat to other people, other animals, or the surrounding environment), and overall, RESPONSIBLY. Part of this is making a satisfactory environment for the animal so they can be what they are. For example, if they move around alot, and require lots of space, then give them a big space that they can run around in.

Remember that after a wild animal is born into captivity and kept for a certain amount of time, it may lose its instincts or at least its survival skills.


If you need some comedy to give you a better idea of why an animal that was born and raised in captivity may not survive by himself in the wild, here's a light hearted scene from the Disney movie "The Fox and The Hound", in which Tod, who's been raised by Widow Tweed after his real mother was killed, tries to catch a fish to impress Vixey, but he doesn't have the proper survival skills.


In short: I do accept the ownership of "exotic pets", but under VERY strict conditions. The animal(s) should be treated with kindness and respect, and it would be good if their owners and handlers would give their animals love.

I hate it whenever someone buys an animal becuase they think it looks cool or it satisfies their ego or whatnot, lockup the animal in a limited space, and then the animal grows up and they find out that they can no longer take care of it, or otherwise fail to treat the animal as well as they should.

And definitely be careful about who you get any animal from:



Some of my fellow libertarians may disagree with me as to how animals should be treated. But to me, since animals are living individuals that can feel pain and have emotions, I wish to protect their rights.



Now, let's specifically talk about wild canines as pets.


Do not think that a wolfdog is all that easy:
Warning: some swearing in the video below.

For lookalike alternatives to real wolves or wolf dogs, I suggest reading 11 Dogs that Look Like Wolves.


Okay, so still as far as canines go, you might be thinking "how hard is it to have a fox"?

Well it would depend on the type of fox you're thinking about.

For reference, let's take a quick peek at the challenges to owning the most common type of fox in the world (and is most often the species that people refer to when they're talking about foxes), the red fox.

For some of the challenges and requirements of having a red fox, go read the following articles:
And Loki the red fox may seem cute at first, but what his owner has to put up with every day is annoying, and takes dedication.


Even when you're going with the smallest type of fox, the fennec fox, you still cannot treat them in the same way that you would with a cat or dog.

If you want a domesticated red fox, get ready to go to Russia, get set back round $8,000 US, and jump through the legal hoops of wherever you live and all of the travelling and potential transportation, handling, and possibly even customs fees.
And, perhaps in part because domesticated foxes are so new compared to dogs, they're still more challenging to own than cats or dogs of comparable size (http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2012-10/fyi-domesticated-foxes).

But before you even do any of that, you must read about the laws of your country, and the administrative territorial entity (ie state, province, prefecture, territory, and so on and so forth) that you live in.

For more info on fennec foxes and wolfdogs:

For lookalike alternatives to real red foxes, I suggest reading 11 Dogs That Look Like a Fox.


As a bonus, if you read the part about how someone who was looking for a pet fox did not want their face to get bitten off, I'll throw in this clip about what Finnick says to Nick about kissing him (skip to 2:34):

And to wrap this up, I'll mention how when Ms. Fox asked her husband, Mr. Fox, why he lied to her and kept taking birds from farms, he responded with "because I'm a wild animal".



A comment on a scene from the movie "The Fox and The Child".
1:19:00 NEVER do that to a wild animal unless you are being watched by someone who knows to to properly interact with wild animals, and/or you yourself has lots of experience with handling wild animals. They're not domesticated like cats or dogs (with the exception of Russian domesticated Foxes, which are very rare): they're wild animals, and are not adapted to live with us. They are not evil: they simply do not know any better, which is why I feel that it's even worse than locking someone into a prison cell becuase most humans can have some understanding of what's going on, while a animal doesn't.
I felt bad for both the girl and the Red Fox becuase neither one understood what was going on. The girl made the mistake of assuming that a wild animal can tolerate being locked up to the extent that a cat or dog would.

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